SpeedZone Herbicide Lawn Weed Killer

Maybe you’ve been told by the lawn guru in your neighborhood that SpeedZone herbicide (see lowest price) is the best possible option for chemical control in your yard. Perhaps you’ve combed through dozens of reviews, finally eliminated what seems like a huge variety of options and decided that SpeedZone weed killer is just what you need to keep your lawn looking fabulous. It kills over 100 varieties of weed that are often the most problematic, including wild violets, legumes and clovers, wild garlic and onion, common lespedeza, spurge, plantain, chickweed, poison oak and poison ivy. Then you get to the store and discover that there are not one, not two, but three different varieties available! How do you choose between them? Though they’re all great products, here’s the down low on the differences between the different Speedzone herbicide available for your lawn.

SpeedZone Red Herbicide

SpeedZone Red is the original version of the popular selective broadleaf herbicide produced by Gordon’s. It provides post-emergent broadleaf control in turf that is very fast acting, which is a great benefit if you’ve got company coming this weekend or just need to get rid of some broadleaf weeds fast. It works very well in cool conditions, when a lot of other herbicides just won’t get the job done and can be used in established cool and warm season grasses. If you’re looking for a product that is easy for homeowners to apply to their lawns, SpeedZone’s Lawn Weed Killer is a great option. Able to be applied as either a spot treatment for problem areas or as a watering-in product for getting your yard under control, this particular SpeedZone variant is designed specifically to meet homeowner needs. Like the other SpeedZones, it also is rain resistant within a short period of time, specifically two hours, as well as having only a two week window before you can reseed bare patches that have formed from weed removal.

Speed Zone 2, 4-D 2-Ethylhexyl Ester
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Speed Zone 2, 4-D 2-Ethylhexyl Ester
  • Great for use in ornamental turf or for golf courses
  • Used for general weed control
  • Excellent post-emergent activity
  • Proven performance for broadleaf control in turfgrass

SpeedZone can be used in a variety of cool and warm season grasses, including the following:

Cool Season Grasses

  • Kentucky Bluegrass
  • Perennial Rye Grass
  • Tall Fescue
  • Perennial Rye Grass
  • Bullet Point 2

Warm Season Grasses

  • Common Bermuda Grass
  • Zoysia Grass

Precautions and Limitations

As with any pesticide, be sure to take a good look at the label for safety information, basic MSDS data and application quirks that will help you get the best possible results. Because SpeedZone is such a potent and fast-acting herbicide, it falls under restricted usage by licensed applicators only in some states:

  • SpeedZone Red is restricted in Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, Vermont and Hawaii.
  • SpeedZone Southern is restricted in Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Washington D.C., Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Alaska and Maine.
  • Speedzone Lawn Weed Killer is restricted in Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, Vermont and Alaska.

If you live in one of these states and feel that SpeedZone really is the best option for your lawn, all is not lost! Try calling a reputable local lawn service. Their trained technicians often have special certifications or licensing that allows them to spray products that are restricted from use by the average homeowner. If Speedzone is legal for homeowners to apply in your state, be sure to follow all the precautions recommended on the label and don’t overspray.

For the most part, any Speedzone herbicide variety will do well against broadleaf weeds, can be applied a few hours before rain or irrigation, acts quickly and can be reseeded within a couple weeks. Because the action of the herbicide is somewhat persistent in the soil, if you want to plant ornamental broadleaves in the area you’ll be spraying, you’ll need to either wait longer or find another general-purpose herbicide such as glyphosate.

By being proactive in getting a grip on problems before they get out of hand and following a basic lawn maintenance program that includes pest control, soil management and fertilizer application, you’ll have a fabulous lawn to enjoy for years to come with minimal maintenance!

About the author

Mark Kelly

Hi, I'm Mark the owner of Yard Care Gurus. I love to be outside working on my lawn, planning my next project. I created this website to help people like you find the best products for yard care and great advice. Thanks for stopping by!

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